Feast of Mary, Aborigines, Songlines, Luke 1:46-55, Isaiah 61:10-11, Psalm 34:1-9, Monastic, Life Vows

What Is The Songline Of Your Life? – A Sermon On Luke 1:46-55

Are you familiar with songlines? Songlines are a part of the aboriginal life. The aborigines tell a creation story in which creation ancestors wandered the continent singing out the name of everything that crossed their path – birds, animals, plants, rocks, caves, desert brush, waterholes – thereby singing the world and all creation into existence. It’s akin to Adam naming the animals (Genesis 2:19-20). The paths their ancestors charted are called songlines.

In every life there is a songline waiting to be sung. We all have one. We may each sing in different keys and use verses particular to our lives but it is the same song. It is the primordial melody of God carrying God’s eternal Word for each of our lives.

Charlottesville, Fear, Courage, Social Justice, Matthew 14:22-33, Violence, Jesus, I Am

I Look At Charlottesville And I Am Afraid – A Sermon on Matthew 14:22-33

The boat of our life is far from land right now. The night is dark, the waves are high, and the wind is strong. There is every reason to be afraid but I don’t want to live in fear and I don’t want you to either. I want us to see the light that shines in the darkness of this night, a light the darkness cannot overcome. I want us to hear the waves slapping against the bottom of Jesus’ feet as he walks toward us. I want us to feel the wind of change. I want us to make room in the boat for Jesus.

Leadership, Sermon, Monasticism, Abba Poeman, Esau, Jacob, Genesis 32:3-31, Reconciliation, Sayings of the Desert Fathers

Deliver Me From The Hand Of My Brother – A Sermon On Genesis 32:3-31

We all have an Esau. Individuals, communities, parishes, religious orders, nations, you, and me – we all have an Esau. I am not talking about a literal Esau but a symbolic and metaphorical Esau. That does not mean, however, that Esau is not real. He is absolutely real. Esau is the face of our past guilts and regrets. Esau is the temptation to believe that we are not enough and we need to be someone or something else. Esau is our fear of the future. Esau is the one with whom we wrestle in the depths of our soul to discover our true name and identity, and to find the blessing that is uniquely ours.

Genesis 29:15-28, Matthew 13:31-33 44-52, Proper 12A, Parable, Kingdom of Heaven, Jacob, Rachel, Leah, Expectations, What You See Is What you Get

Dealing With The Unknown, Unchosen, or Unwanted – A Sermon on Genesis 29:15-28 and Matthew 13:31-33, 44-52

The problem is that life doesn’t always work that way. Nor is that, Jesus says, how the kingdom of heaven works. Sometimes real life, kingdom life, is like a net dragged through the sea. It pulls up both the good and the bad. Other times it is like a field that you see day after day. It’s always there. Not much changes. It’s just an ordinary field like any other field except that it is not. Deep within that ordinary dirt is unseen treasure waiting to be discovered.

Human Trafficking, Prayer, Prayer for Victims of Human Trafficking

A Prayer for Victims of Human Trafficking

Almighty and gracious God, you heard the cries of your people enslaved in Egypt, you empowered Moses and Aaron to speak boldly to Pharaoh on their behalf, and you delivered them from their bondage. We hold before you the lives and cries of all enslaved and trafficked people, especially those who died in or are…

Parable of the Sower, Proper 10A, Matthew 13:1-9 13-23, Sermon, Sower, Interior Life

A Sower Went Out To Sow – A Sermon on Matthew 13:1-9, 18-23

So here’s what I am wondering. Might you and I be sowers of seed? When we hear or read this parable we are pretty quick to judge ourselves or others as one of the four types of ground: the beaten path, the rocky ground, thorny terrain, or good soil. But have you ever thought of yourself as the sower in today’s parable?

A Father’s Faith Or A Father’s Certitude? – A Sermon on Genesis 22:1-14

What do you think Sarah would have said if Abraham had told her his plans? Do you think she would have shared his certitude? Picture Abraham coming to Sarah and saying, “Let me tell you what God told me. Isaac and I are gong on a little trip. …” It’s not hard to imagine that she would have had a few things to say to Abraham. What would you have said to him? And why didn’t he tell Sarah his plans? Why didn’t he tell Isaac? Why didn’t he tell the two young men he took with him up the mountain? If Abraham was willing to question, and argue and negotiate with God over the fate of Sodom and Gomorrah why would he not do so for his own son, his only son, whom he loves? What parent here today wouldn’t do that? What parent wouldn’t at least say, “Take me instead?”