Epiphany House Blessing With Chalk

The Church has a custom of blessing homes on the Feast of the Epiphany (January 6) and the weeks following. Family and friends gather to ask God’s blessing on their homes and those who live in or visit the home. It is an invitation for Jesus to be a daily guest in our home, our comings and goings, our conversations, our work and play, our joys and sorrows.

A traditional way of doing this is to use chalk blessed during the liturgy for the Feast of Epiphany and write the following above the home’s entryway:

20 + C + M + B + 20.

The letters C, M, B have two meanings. They are the initials of the traditional names of the three magi: Caspar, Melchior, and Balthazar. They also abbreviate the Latin words Christus mansionem benedicat, “May Christ bless the house.” The “+” signs represent the cross and 2020 is the year.

Three Wise Men, House Blessing by Unknown, SLO – Hišni žegen (Hishni shegen), na steni v nekem slovenskem stanovanju, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Marking the doorway to one’s home is rooted in the Old Testament. Holy Scripture reminds us that God has at times commanded his people to mark their doors. The Israelites marked their doors with the lamb’s blood on the night of the passover (Exodus 12:7). A similar command was given with the Shema Yisrael:

Hear, O Israel: The Lord is our God, the Lord alone.
You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart,
and with all your soul, and with all your might.
Keep these words that I am commanding you today in your heart …
and write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates.
(Deuteronomy 6:4-6, 9)

Blessing the Chalk

V. Our help is the name of the Lord:
R. The maker of heaven and earth.

V. The Lord shall watch over your going out and your coming in:
R. From this time forth for evermore.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And also with you.

Let us pray.
Loving God, bless this chalk which you have created, that it may be helpful to your people; and grant that through the invocation of your most Holy Name all who use it in faith to write upon the doors of their homes the names of your saints, Caspar, Melchior, and Balthazar, may receive health of body and protection of soul for all who dwell in or visit their home; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Instructions for Blessing the Home

Using the blessed chalk mark the lintel of your front door (or front porch step) as follows:

20 + C + M + B + 20 saying:

The three Wise Men, Caspar, Melchior, and Balthazar followed the star of
God’s Son who became human two thousand and twenty years ago.
May Christ bless our home and remain with us throughout the new year.  Amen.

Then say the following prayer:

Visit, O blessed Lord, this home with the gladness of your presence. Bless all who live or visit here with the gift of your love; and grant that we may manifest your love to each other and to all whose lives we touch. May we grow in grace and in the knowledge and love of you; guide, comfort, and strengthen us in peace, O Jesus Christ, now and for ever. Amen.

“Chalking the door” is a way to celebrate and physically mark the occasion of the Epiphany and God’s blessing of our lives and home. With time the chalk will fade. As it does we let the meaning of the written symbols sink into the depths of our hearts and be manifest in our words and actions.

Another Epiphany tradition is the Proclamation of Easter. Since the Epiphany is a fixed date feast (January 6) and also the last major fixed date feast before we enter the Easter cycle which is characterized by moveable dates, it was a convenient time to proclaim the date of Easter and other moveable feasts and fasts. Read the Epiphany Proclamation of Easter 2020.

6 thoughts on “Epiphany House Blessing With Chalk

  1. Thank you, thank you, thank you for not being like SOME websites that say that the “man of the household” must be the one doing the blessing and marking the lintel with chalk. It just opens the whole “who has authority here?” debate.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to carolynsbelshe Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.